Perazzi… Ferrari of Shotguns

Posted Posted in Olympic Trap, Shooting Equipment, Shotguns, Vintage

Hand-engraving of Perazzi guns is carried out in a special top-floor atelier under full daylight illumination. After 20 years of of shotgun shooting and amateur gun smithing, coaching and general involvement with firearms, quite a number of guns have passed through my hands. As most of those years were spent in England and Europe, many of them bore the names of the elite of the shotgun world: Purdey, Boss, Franchi, Beretta, Merkel and Sodia, as well as Parker and Ithaca from this side of the pond. When I first read about the Perazzi, my senses, including that monitor of them all, the sixth one, told me I was being introduced into something more than a little out of the ordinary. The author’s enthusiasm for the gun shone through and between the lines. Events moved rapidly. The next day I went to see if all the rhetoric was justified. I had only to take the Perazzi over-and-under trap models in my […]

Release Triggers

Posted Posted in Olympic Trap, Shooting Equipment, Shotguns, Trap, Vintage

An Allen Timney release trigger for the Remington 1100. It works like a charm and is cleverly “uncocked” by just pushing a button he installs. Release triggers are enjoying a constantly growing popularity, so we’ll examine the reasons for their use and present some expert views on their technical requirements. The release trigger was originally designed in America to overcome a tendency among some trapshooters to flinch when pulling the trigger. Flinching seems to be virtually unknown among bunker shooters in the rest of the world, so it seems flinching is in some way peculiar to American trapshooting. Release trigger specialist Allen Timney of Cerritos, California, defines the reasons for flinching as, “…the combination of recoil, noise of the gun and perhaps the gun not fitting properly and kicking the shooter in the face.” While I don’t totally disagree, it must be pointed out International trapshooters used to shoot far heavier 3-3/4-drams, 1-1/4 oz. loads and still frequently fire two […]

Up-Tight Overchoking

Posted Posted in Olympic Trap, Shooting Equipment, Shotguns, Tips and Tricks, Vintage

Most shooters, especially clay busters and live pigeon shooters, are aware of the standard method of assessing choke, but to recapitulate briefly, choke is the degree of constriction between the diameter of the barrel, just beyond the chambers and forcing cones, and the diameter at the muzzle. The resultant patterns produced are graded in terms of the percentage of pellets from the original shot charge, which find their tortuous way on to a sheet of paper forty yards away and into a thirty-inch circle circumscribed upon it. Full choke has 70 percent, improved modified 65, modified 60, improved cylinder 50 percent and cylinder 40 percent. It often is stated erroneously that cylinder indicates a complete lack of constriction. English barrel-chokers found that a barrel totally devoid of choke produces uncontrolled and widely varying patterns. Therefore, almost surreptitiously, they put .003 to .005-inch constriction into the guns of customers, who specified true cylinder. For new scatter gunners, the simplest analogy to […]